Growing Up & Losing Friends

Back to Article
Back to Article

Growing Up & Losing Friends

Google

Google

Google

Jessica Cedeno, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The saying “the more you grow up the less friends you have” is widely known and even though this idea can be challenging; it’s part of life. As one matures, the connections formed with acquaintances become less of a priority while strong true friendships are the ones we feel the need to keep closer to us. This disconnection between close friends is common in middle school and high school teens.

One of the many reasons there’s a disconnection between friendships is the use of time. When life gets busier and one takes on more responsibility, the window for leisure activities is limited. When this time is limited, we choose to prioritize family and friends; these are the ones who support, motivate, and tend to bring out the good in one. Therefore, the people who are not helping to better ourselves slowly become more distant and less important to our lives.

Studies show that as we age, our lives are also more private and we do not want to share information with just anyone. Because one is older and has experienced more, people only want to share certain information with people they are very close to, which tends to be one or two people. When this happens, one closes up and becomes more private with others.

When one is younger, the toleration for people and situations is not a big deal, but as we get older, the toleration for the insincerity of people become less acceptable. Over time friends show their true colors revealing their true intentions; while these intentions may not always be negative, one is now more knowledgeable. Since we know how we want to be treated and know right from wrong, our expectations are higher for people which leads to the loss of fake friends and relations.

Cassidy Duff, a senior, states, “In middle school and freshman year, I was worried about how many friends I had. Now that I’m a senior, I’m worried about where I’m going after high school so I only want to have friends who will stick by my side.  Therefore, I’m not worried about how many friends I have anymore.”

Having friends in younger years was seen as a needed aspect of life. Having a desire to feel included and wanted, we rely on the surrounding of many friends in order to fill that gap. As we get older, our priorities change and our focus is shifted to other important things, not worrying about how many friends we have anymore but the quality of them.

While the feeling of being alone is scary, the lost of friendships should be seen as a good thing. Growing up and relying on a few true friends is more beneficial than surrounding yourself with ones that will be quick to change on you.

Source: https://truththeory.com/2017/12/18/4-key-reasons-lose-friends-age-good-thing/

Print Friendly, PDF & Email